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I had real-world experience. I’d worked in security. I’d worked as a deputy sheriff..CLINT WALKER

Cheyenne star Clint Walker was big, handsome, and a key player in the development of TV westerns. This rugged mountain of a man, said to stand 6’6″, with a 48″ chest and a 32″ waist, played the titular character of TV’s first serious western drama, setting a template followed by shows like Gunsmoke and Bonanza. Walker’s film career never quite lived up to the promise of his 1956-62 Cheyenne run, with one exception — he’s unforgettable as the reluctant badass Samson Posey in The Dirty Dozen.Life sometimes takes us in strange directions. For Clint Walker, life took the scenic route to show business. He began life as Norman Walker thousands of miles away from Hollywood. Nevertheless, the blue-eyed hunk ended his life as a cowboy Western staple, Clint “Cheyenne” Walker. In between those two distant points, Walker worked on cargo ships, riverboats, oil fields, and casinos.

He employed his considerable bulk shifting payloads or, as a bouncer, unwanted guests. His life took a radical turn for the better when actor Van Johnson suggested the gigantic looker try acting as opposed to security. Walker heeded Johnson’s advice figuring, “I’m not going to get that far carrying a gun and a badge. It doesn’t pay that well. If you make movies, you make some pretty good money — plus, the bullets aren’t real!”Walker started in Hollywood as any other actor, taking small roles. First, he was Tarzan with a single memorable line. He recalled:

I come out of the jungle and I beat on my chest. I give the Tarzan yell and I say, ‘You no take Jane.’ These guys get together nose-to-nose and shake their heads. And then they say, ‘We no take Jane.’He followed this nuanced portrayal with an appearance as a silent Sardinian guard in The Ten Commandments.

That’s where Walker really began to learn the ins and outs of Tinsel Town. “Here I was, just a beginner. But I’m working with Anne Baxter, Yul Brynner, Charlton Heston, Sir Cedric Hardwicke, Woody Strode — all these greats. And when I saw them make some mistakes, I thought, Woo! Maybe there’s hope for me. [Laughs.] I began to see what acting was really all about. I know Sir Cedric Hardwicke had a line in there somewhere and he meant to say “these halls” and he said “these balls”. Everybody had a heck of a laugh.”Some actors toil away for a lifetime, never getting their break. For Walker, that break came early in the form of Cheyenne. Despite little experience, Walker owned a few advantages over the army of other actors eager for their shot.

I had real-world experience. I’d worked in security. I’d worked as a deputy sheriff. I’d carried a gun and a badge. And I felt right at home with it. That probably helped me some. I figured, Hey, I’m not going to get it, so why not just relax? Just relax and not worry about it. So that’s what I did. And then Jack Warner went through those two days of screen tests. And when they showed mine, he just said, ‘That is Cheyenne,’ and that was it. And like I said, he changed my name to Clint.At this point, going from bouncer to western TV star ranked as an all-time achievement. However, Cheyenne took place during the western boom and competed with numerous other westerns to stay on the air. In fact, initially, Cheyenne was slated to share airtime with two other Westerns. They fell to the wayside and “Cheyenne” became a massive hit. Walker partially credited working for a big studio like Warner Bros for their success.
“I was blessed by being with Warner Bros., and them being willing to make it an hour-long program. I had a big advantage over the guys that were doing Gunsmoke [which was then a half-hour show] and some of the others. In a half-hour, you can’t develop your characters adequately.”
Walker also recalled that Warner Bros. “had some really good cutters. We couldn’t afford 1,000 cattle if we were doing a cattle drive. But they could go back to their big feature and a good [editor] could cut scenes of the cattle out of a film and put it in our Cheyenne.”
“Of course, once in a while, the cutters could really screw you up. I’d always try to have it so that there’d be one point where they’d pan over to me, and I’d be putting new bullets in my gun, so it would be more believable. Well, the doggone cutters would cut that scene out, and here I’d be shooting a six-shooter about 16 times without reloading. [Laughs.] Oh, those 16-shooters. Nothing like them.”
emplate followed by shows like Gunsmoke and Bonanza. Walker’s film career never quite lived up to the promise of his 1956-62 Cheyenne run, with one exception — he’s unforgettable as the reluctant badass Samson Posey in The Dirty Dozen.
Clint Walker and his trusty horse named Brandy. (cowboysindians)Life sometimes takes us in strange directions. For Clint Walker, life took the scenic route to show business. He began life as Norman Walker thousands of miles away from Hollywood. Nevertheless, the blue-eyed hunk ended his life as a cowboy Western staple, Clint “Cheyenne” Walker. In between those two distant points, Walker worked on cargo ships, riverboats, oil fields, and casinos.
He employed his considerable bulk shifting payloads or, as a bouncer, unwanted guests. His life took a radical turn for the better when actor Van Johnson suggested the gigantic looker try acting as opposed to security. Walker heeded Johnson’s advice figuring, “I’m not going to get that far carrying a gun and a badge. It doesn’t pay that well. If you make movies, you make some pretty good money — plus, the bullets aren’t real!”
Picking Up The Tools Of the Trade
Seeing great actors screw up gave Walker hope he could make it as an actor. (pinterest)Walker started in Hollywood as any other actor, taking small roles. First, he was Tarzan with a single memorable line. He recalled:
I come out of the jungle and I beat on my chest. I give the Tarzan yell and I say, ‘You no take Jane.’ These guys get together nose-to-nose and shake their heads. And then they say, ‘We no take Jane.’He followed this nuanced portrayal with an appearance as a silent Sardinian guard in The Ten Commandments.
That’s where Walker really began to learn the ins and outs of Tinsel Town. “Here I was, just a beginner. But I’m working with Anne Baxter, Yul Brynner, Charlton Heston, Sir Cedric Hardwicke, Woody Strode — all these greats. And when I saw them make some mistakes, I thought, Woo! Maybe there’s hope for me. [Laughs.] I began to see what acting was really all about. I know Sir Cedric Hardwicke had a line in there somewhere and he meant to say “these halls” and he said “these balls”. Everybody had a heck of a laugh.”
Very Early Success
Walker owned plenty of experience drawing women with his shirtless body. (youtube)Some actors toil away for a lifetime, never getting their break. For Walker, that break came early in the form of Cheyenne. Despite little experience, Walker owned a few advantages over the army of other actors eager for their shot.
I had real-world experience. I’d worked in security. I’d worked as a deputy sheriff. I’d carried a gun and a badge. And I felt right at home with it. That probably helped me some. I figured, Hey, I’m not going to get it, so why not just relax? Just relax and not worry about it. So that’s what I did. And then Jack Warner went through those two days of screen tests. And when they showed mine, he just said, ‘That is Cheyenne,’ and that was it. And like I said, he changed my name to Clint.

Standing Out Among The Crowd
Shirtless beefcake and a good story kept “Cheyenne” on air for years. (picclick.co.uk)At this point, going from bouncer to western TV star ranked as an all-time achievement. However, Cheyenne took place during the western boom and competed with numerous other westerns to stay on the air. In fact, initially, Cheyenne was slated to share airtime with two other Westerns. They fell to the wayside and “Cheyenne” became a massive hit. Walker partially credited working for a big studio like Warner Bros for their success.
“I was blessed by being with Warner Bros., and them being willing to make it an hour-long program. I had a big advantage over the guys that were doing Gunsmoke [which was then a half-hour show] and some of the others. In a half-hour, you can’t develop your characters adequately.”
Walker also recalled that Warner Bros. “had some really good cutters. We couldn’t afford 1,000 cattle if we were doing a cattle drive. But they could go back to their big feature and a good [editor] could cut scenes of the cattle out of a film and put it in our Cheyenne.”
“Of course, once in a while, the cutters could really screw you up. I’d always try to have it so that there’d be one point where they’d pan over to me, and I’d be putting new bullets in my gun, so it would be more believable. Well, the doggone cutters would cut that scene out, and here I’d be shooting a six-shooter about 16 times without reloading. [Laughs.] Oh, those 16-shooters. Nothing like them.”
Beefcake Astride a Horse
Walker and the horse ended up getting along great. (neptsdepths.blogspot)A major part of Cheyenne’s and Walker’s success came from his impressive physique. One reporter commented that “he has snow on his shoulders six months of the year.” His character also found convenient or completely inconvenient reasons for him to take his shirt off. For female and probably some male viewers, it worked like catnip.

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Ian Ziering was involved in an apparent road scuffle with multiple bikers in Los Angeles on New Year’s Eve


In a video obtained by TMZ, the former Beverly Hills, 90210 star seemed to be surrounded by a group of people riding mini-bikes on Hollywood Blvd. Ziering, 59, then got out of his vehicle and appeared to get into a physical altercation with one of them.

Soon after the two started fighting, other bikers circled back and surrounded the actor as they all started attacking him. The Sharknado actor then appeared to run away from the group as he tried to cross to the other side of the roadway.

Per the TMZ clip, he was chased by the group and apparently grabbed by the shirt, pushed into another vehicle and struck more than once.The Los Angeles Police Department confirmed to CW affiliate KTLA that officers responded to the area at Hollywood Blvd and Highland Ave. around 3 p.m. on Sunday following “reports of a fight that broke out after the group of bikers were driving recklessly.”

The incident remains under investigation, per the outlet.
The LAPD and reps for Ziering did not immediately respond to PEOPLE’s requests for comment on Monday. The actor has yet to post about the incident on his Instagram account at the time of publication.
TMZ reported that the actor was listed as a victim in an official report, and that as of 6 p.m. PT Sunday, police had not made any arrests.
In another video released by the outlet, Ziering appeared to be comforting his daughter, Mia, 12, who looked like she was upset by the incident involving her father and the group of riders.According to TMZ, “Ian and Mia seem physically fine.”
In March 2023, at 90s Con in Connecticut, Ziering opened up about his career during a 90210 panel moderated by PEOPLE’s Andrea Lavinthal. As he shared at the time, the actor almost had a future in reality TV.“Shortly after [Beverly Hills, 90210] went off the air, Missy Halperin, who we all know [in casting], said, ‘Ian, would you ever consider hosting a reality show?’ And I’m like, ‘No. I’m an actor.’ That reality show was American Idol,” Ziering said.
“Not that it was an offer,” he added. “But would I consider my name being thrown in a hat.”
Still, he joked that he “would have been horrible” and instead has his eyes on The Price Is Right.
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Bruce Willis was fired off course by an explosion that almost ended his life at just 33-years-old


Bruce Willis narrowly dodged death in Die Hard stunt gone wrong – ‘laughed about it’Bruce Willis was fired off course by an explosion that almost ended his life at just 33-years-old.

Bruce Willis made a name for himself in the 1980s with the incredible Die Hard film series.

And while his character, the rogue cop John McClane, got away some some jaw-dropping death-defying stunts throughout the five films thus far, his first picture as the hero was almost his last.

Willis – who recently retired after being diagnosed with dementia – joined the John McTiernan-directed picture at just 33-years-old and was eager to make his mark on the film industry.
This meant doing all of his own stunts and putting as much physical effort into the performance as possible.
Willis’ excitement almost killed him just a few days into filming, though, when a stunt involving him jumping off a five-storey building sent him flying through the air on the wrong trajectory.
Willis’ unbelievable stunt was recalled in the new Nick de Semlyen book The Last Action Heroes. In it, the American actor recalled jumping off a five-storey parking garage while covered in flame-repellant gel.
As Willis leapt off the building, explosions were set off to complete the incredible stunt – but something went awry during the caper’s preparation.
When the explosions were set off Willis was caught in the crossfire, sending him way off course on his fall. As a result, he just barely managed to land on the giant airbag placed beneath him for safety. (Via Fox News)
Willis landed on the edge of the safety mat and – against all odds – was completely unharmed. But the cast and crew watching believed they had just witnessed the star’s death.
Willis recalled: “When I landed, everyone came running over to me and I thought they were going to say, ‘Great job! Attaboy!’ And what they were doing is seeing if I’m alive because I almost missed the bag.”
According to the book, Die Hard’s director and crew decided to film this stunt early in production so they had time to recast John McClane if Willis were to die.
At the time of filming, Willis was married to Demi Moore, who was extremely unhappy about how the stunt was handled.
She wrote in her memoir Inside Out that her visit to the set was “terrible”. “He nearly died jumping off a five-storey garage,” she explained.
“Just making it onto the airbag below when he was blown off course by a scripted explosion. He laughed about it. I didn’t.”PROC. BY MOVIES

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Wayne suffered numerous physical difficulties through the years, and while filming Rio Lobo, he couldn’t use one side of his body


John Wayne is a Western film icon and starred in many notable films during the Hollywood Golden Age. For over 30 years, fans saw his name attached to Westerns and war movies and couldn’t wait to see what he was filming next. But that doesn’t mean filming came easy for the superstar, especially in regard to injuries. Wayne suffered numerous physical difficulties through the years, and while filming Rio Lobo, he couldn’t use one side of his body. Here’s why.

Rio Lobo, a remake of Rio Bravo and El Dorado, came out in 1970 and featured John Wayne as the lead. Wayne played Cord McNally, a Civil War veteran searching for two traitors who caused McNally’s unit to go down. McNally travels to the town of Rio Lobo to unearth a shocking discovery.

Rio Lobo was director Howard Hawks’ last film, and it was far from the first time he worked with Wayne. “The last picture we made, I called him up and said, ‘Duke, I’ve got a story,’” Hawks said in 1971, according to Express.co.uk. “He said, ‘I can’t make it for a year, I’m all tied up.’ And I said, ‘Well, that’s all right, it’ll take me a year to get it finished.’ He said, ‘Good, I’ll be all ready.’ And he came down on location and he said, ‘What’s this about?’ And I told him the story. He never even read it, he didn’t know anything about it.”

Ultimately, Rio Lobo bombed, and Hawks blamed it on Waynes being too old and out of shape for the movie to succeed. But Waynes had other difficulties on set. Before filming, he fractured three ribs while filming The Undefeated and gained weight for True Grit. He also tore a ligament in his shoulder. Filmmakers had to film only one side of Wayne’s body because he couldn’t move one arm.
Wayne’s torn shoulder was particularly difficult when it came to navigating the fight scenes in the film. Hawks had to utilize stand-in actors, and Wayne could only be seen from certain angles. Mounting and getting off of the horse smoothly also proved near impossible.
John Wayne had just previously gained weight for ‘True Grit’
As stated before, John Wayne was asked to gain weight for True Grit before filming Rio Lobo. Producer Hal Wallis hired Henry Hathaway to direct True Grit, and Hathaway requested that Wayne gain weight for the role of Marshal Reuben J. Cogburn. Wayne was reportedly overjoyed with the request.
The role came with another request that Wayne didn’t want to give into, though — and that was the eye patch. Wayne worried that an eye patch would have his fans turn against him, as it wasn’t the image they were used to seeing. But Wallis requested the eye patch remain.
However, Wallis and Wayne did compromise on one other aspect of Wayne’s appearance as Cogburn, though. They both agreed that Wayne didn’t have to have a mustache to play the character.
He didn’t understand why filmgoers wanted to watch ‘tough and bleak’ WesternsWhile John Wayne is known for filming classic, gritty Westerns, he reportedly didn’t understand their appeal.
“I was getting anxious because there was this young guy called Clint Eastwood making Westerns in Italy and having tremendous success with them,” Wayne said at the end of the 1960s. “All of a sudden, the studios all wanted Eastwood to come and make Westerns for them, but they were not the kind of Westerns I’d been making. They were tough and bleak. I don’t get it. What do people see in these films?”
With that said, True Grit won Wayne Best Actor at the Academy Awards in 1970. Unfortunately, Rio Lobo didn’t win him the same accolades.
Elements of this story were first reported by Mank’s Movie Musings.
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