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Clint Eastwood

Clint Eastwood has once again created the most terrifying villain in Star Wars .

Every fan of the Star Wars galaxy has heard the term “space Western” thrown out to describe the franchise. That phrase has stuck for a reason, as it perfectly encapsulates the inspirations flooding George Lucas’ mind when creating the Original Trilogy.

Lucas is not coy when speaking about his inspirations being drawn from Samurai films and mid-20th century Westerns like A Fistful of Dollars. When returning to his greatest story during development for Star Wars: The Clone Wars, Lucas, along with Dave Filoni and Henry Gilroy, took inspiration from another film in Clint Eastwood’s “Dollars Trilogy” when creating a new bounty hunter.

That bounty hunter is, of course, the deadly Cad Bane, a character who recently made his brief live-action debut in Disney+’s The Book of Boba Fett. The blue-skinned gunslinger owes a lot to the trilogy of spaghetti Western films, but one character from the series’ final film, The Good, the Bad and the Ugly, directly influenced his look, demeanor and grit. Representing “the Bad” in the film’s title was Lee Van Cleef’s iconic Angel Eyes, who very well may be Earth’s version of Cad Bane.

When watching Van Cleef as Angel Eyes in The Good, the Bad and the Ugly, the similarities between the two characters are striking. The cold-blooded killers share so many qualities, from their signature grimaces to their infatuation with earning money at the cost of others’ lives. Between their famous wide-brimmed hats and Bane’s devilish red eyes giving a wink to “The Bad’s” name, Angel Eyes, Lucas was practically begging for fans to make the connection. It seems like the only thing missing is Van Cleef’s truly superb mustache.

Cad Bane was introduced in 2009 during the Season 1 finale of The Clone Wars. This was a strong call on the creatives’ end because his inclusion intrigued fans at the potential for a new iconic Star Wars villain, which was honestly something the series desperately needed at the time. During the episode, titled “Hostage Crisis,” Cad Bane proves himself not only to be a physical threat but a mental one as well, much like Angel Eyes, who’d often play mind games to get a step ahead.

Cobb Vanth looked out across the Tatooine desert to see a shadowy figure approaching, it wouldn’t have been out of place for a tumbleweed to roll through the shot. The slow tilt up of Bane’s head that revealed the ruby-red eyes below his wethered hat felt lived in and something directly out of a Sergio Leone storyboard. Even the episode’s title, “From the Desert Comes a Stranger,” sounds like the name of a forgotten Western sitting in someone’s VHS collection.

The ambiance of Star Wars has always been influenced by the immortal images captured by directors like Leone, Kurosawa and Eastwood. The scum and villainy living on the streets of a certain Daimyo’s Mos Espa are the same types of characters that would be seen clearing out of Dodge just before a shoot-out. Cad Bane’s emergence into the Star Wars canon only continues that tradition and is truly a welcomed addition.

Some may see this inspiration as a direct rip-off on Lucas’ part, as the influence is so heavy-handed in the series. However, the same is true for Kurosawa, who watched American Westerns when prepping to create his films, which went on to influence Leone when creating Angel Eyes. At this moment, it is unclear if Cad Bane’s appearance in The Book of Boba Fett will be his last. Hopefully not, as his presence carries on a tradition that started in the original trilogy, and it was honestly a weak way for such a terrifying figure to go out.

Clint Eastwood

The Shining Actor Broke Down Into Tears While Working With Clint Eastwood After Being Traumatized By Stanley Kubrick On Set

Director Stanley Kubrick is known for being a taskmaster on his sets. Many actors have recounted horror stories about the director’s dedication to details and how they had to endure as much as a hundred takes due to Kubrick’s penchant for perfectionism.
Scatman Crothers, the actor who played Dick Hallorann in Kubrick’s adaptation of The Shining also recounted memories of going on multiple takes for simple shots. In fact, Crothers was affected so strongly by Kubrick’s style that when he next worked with director Clint Eastwood, he broke into tears as he was satisfied with a single take.
Scatman Crothers On Stanley Kubrick’s Style Of Filmmaking

Scatman Crothers

Scatman Crothers

Actor and musician Scatman Crothers got to work on Stanley Kubrick’s The Shining after being recommended by his frequent collaborator Jack Nicholson. Nicholson and Crothers had featured in three movies before and while shooting for the classic One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest, Nicholson told him that there was a role waiting for him.
Crothers was cast after he met Stanley Kubrick in the role of Dick Hallorann, the chef of the Overlook Hotel and a man who also possesses the power to ‘shine’ like Danny Torrance. Crothers was reportedly amused by Kubrick’s insane dedication to perfection and the number of takes he filmed to get what he wanted.

Stanley KubrickStanley Kubrick

Talking to Scraps From the Loft, Crothers spoke about Stanley Kubrick’s directing style,
“Stanley shot 87 takes of the scene in the ballroom with all of the cast. Even the part where I get out of the Sno-Cat and walk to the hotel door—a scene that has no dialogue—took 40 takes. Around the 39th take, I asked Stanley, ‘How do you want me to do it?’ He answered. ‘Walk a little bit to your left.’ So I said. ‘Look, show me how you want me to walk, give me the rhythm,’ and then we got the shot.”
Crothers reportedly also performed the stunts in the film on his own, in the scene where he gets struck with an axe by Jack Nicholson. The scene reportedly took twenty-five takes to get right.
Scatman Crothers Broke Down In Tears While Working With Clint Eastwood

Clint EastwoodClint Eastwood

After his grueling stint on The Shining with director Stanley Kubrick, Scatman Crothers went on to work with director Clint Eastwood on the Western-comedy Bronco Billy. The director is known for being extremely efficient and reportedly often films only one take for every shot. This was a polar opposite experience for Crothers, who had by then become used to Kubrick’s intense style.
The actor reportedly broke down in tears after his performance was given the thumbs up by Eastwood after one take. Crotehrs spoke about the directors’ differing working styles,
“Clint’s much more of an easy-going director Clint would do a shot once or twice and I’d ask him, ‘Is that alright?’…Clint would answer, ‘Well sure. Scat.’ I’d say. ‘Okay, man!’ because after working with Stanley [Kubrick] for so long, I was used to doing anywhere from 15 to 30 takes.”
The actor would years later be in tears yet again after being asked how it was to work with such legendary directors. Crothers assured that they were tears of joy.

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Clint Eastwood

You Won’t Believe How Much Clint Eastwood Was Earning Before He Landed His First Leading Role in a Movie

With a career spanning over 6-decades, Clint Eastwood has made a mammoth fortune with his net worth standing at $375M following his contribution to the field of acting, filmmaking, and composing. However, it wasn’t always sunshine and rainbow when it came to his salary in the entertainment industry, especially during his early 20s when he was just starting out as an actor.
Although it took Eastwood a while to land his first acting gig after getting rejected for Six Bridges to Cross, the following year, he made his acting debut in Revenge of the Creature. But after a string of minor and often uncredited roles, his career eventually picked up the pace with the western series Rawhide, for which he wasn’t exactly paid boatloads of money.
Clint Eastwood in Cry Macho

Clint Eastwood
Clint Eastwood Made $700 per Episode for His First Major Project
While it was Sir Sergio Leone’s Dollars trilogy that earned Clint Eastwood international stardom, prior to playing the lead in the Western, it was his part in Rawhide that put him on the map. And for his role of Ramrod Rowdy Yates, he reportedly made around $700 per episode which approximately adds up to $6000 in today’s dollars that pales in comparison to his huge paydays.
A few years after marking his debut in the hit western, the actor would eventually find himself playing the iconic Man with No Name in 1964’s A Fistful of Dollars, which he agreed for $15000.
Rawhide (1959)Rawhide (1959)
Clint Eastwood Almost Didn’t Return for the The Good, the Bad and the Ugly
For the first installment in his Dollars trilogy, Sir Sergio Leone originally aimed to cast James Coburn in the badass role, but eventually let go of his plans for budget issues, as Coburn charged $25000.
Per BBC (via Farout Magazine), Leone stated,
“I really wanted James Coburn, but he was too expensive. The Italian cinema is very poor. We got Clint for $15,000, Coburn wanted $25,000.”
Following the mammoth success of A Fistful of Dollars, Eastwood’s paycheck witnessed a healthy spike for the sequel, as the studio offered him $50,000. But for the threequel, the Unforgiven Star made an astonishing $$250K following his reluctance to reprise the role in The Good, the Bad and the Ugly, with Sir Leone almost recasting Charles Bronson in the role.
Also read: “I don’t like it when it’s dumb”: Yellowstone Star Kevin Costner Revealed He Hates Western Genre Despite Sharing Clint Eastwood’s Rare Record In Hollywood
Clint Eastwood in The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly (1966)Clint Eastwood | The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly
Thankfully, the American icon went on to star in the threequel, often considered the best the genre has to offer, and the film became the biggest success of the trilogy, making around $38 Million.
The Dollars Trilogy is available to rent on Apple TV.

 

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Clint Eastwood

Disaster Drama Film Hereafter: Everything You Need to Know

The disaster drama movie “Hereafter,” directed by Clint Eastwood, explores the supernatural and the philosophical. The movie, which came out in 2010, looks at life after death through a series of interconnected stories.
The goal of this blog is to give a full picture of “Hereafter,” including its plot, cast, production information, reviews, and more.


Storyline
“Hereafter” combines three separate stories, all of which are about death and the future. The movie starts with a dramatic scene of the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami.

It then follows the lives of three characters: a French writer who has a near-death experience, a psychic in San Francisco who can talk to the dead, and a schoolboy in London who loses his twin brother. The people in these stories seek answers to life’s most important questions.
Cast Members
Matt Damon plays psychic George Lonegan, who has trouble with his powers. Cécile de France plays journalist Marie Lelay, who survives the tsunami. And Frankie and George McLaren play the London twins, Marcus and Jason.

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In supporting roles, Bryce Dallas Howard, Jay Mohr, and Thierry Neuvic are also in the cast.

 

The story is more interesting by supporting actors like Bryce Dallas Howard, who plays George’s girlfriend Melanie, and Jay Mohr, who plays George’s brother Billy. Their performances are crucial to the movie’s study of relationships and the afterlife.
The Clint Eastwood movie “Hereafter” is known for taking a careful and thoughtful look at the subject. The production was well planned, especially the scene with the wave, which got great reviews for its realistic appearance.
Filming Locations
The movie was made in many places, such as San Francisco, Paris, and London. The different places give the movie’s look at death and the afterlife a global feel.

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Makers Team

 
The movie did well because of Eastwood’s direction, Peter Morgan’s script, and Tom Stern’s cinematography. The people who made this movie collaborated to bring this complicated story to life.

Reviews from Critics and FFans
Critical reviews of “Hereafter” were mixed. Some people liked how big the story was and how Eastwood directed it, but others thought it moved too slowly. It was, however, usually well-received by audiences who liked how reflective it was.
Where to Watch It?
It is possible to watch “Hereafter” on services like Netflix. This thought-provoking movie can be watched from the comfort of people’s homes by many people.
Matt Damon plays George Lonegan in a way that stands out for being subtle and deep. As Marie Lelay, Cécile de France gives an engaging performance that successfully shows the emotional journey of her character.

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Frankie and George McLaren, who are twins, give moving performances that capture the innocence and pain of youth.
 

 
Conclusion
The film “Hereafter” deals with deep and often unanswerable questions about life after death. The movie is a one-of-a-kind cinematic experience thanks to Clint Eastwood’s nuanced direction, the cast’s powerful performances, and the plot that weaves together different lives and experiences.
“Hereafter” is a movie that makes you think and feel deeply, whether you’re interested in its existential ideas or the emotional journeys of its characters.

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