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Clint Eastwood

Sondra Locke: toxic relationship with Clint Eastwood defined talented actor

Sondra Locke was an actor, producer, director and talented singer. But it was her destiny to be linked forever with Clint Eastwood, whose partner she was from the mid-1970s to the late 1980s. Locke, whose ԁеаtһ was announced on Friday, was a charismatic performer with a tough, lean look who starred alongside Eastwood in hit movies such as The Outlaw Josey Wales, The Gauntlet, Every Which Way But Loose (in which she sang her own songs – also for the sequel Any Which Way You Can) and Bronco Billy. But the pair became trapped in one of the most notoriously toxic relationships in Hollywood history, an ugly, messy and abusive overlap of the personal and professional – a case of love gone sour and mentorship gone terribly wrong.

Locke was already married when she met Eastwood – to a gay sculptor called Gordon Leigh Anderson, with whom she had a platonic relationship. She never divorced him and the marriage was still legal throughout her relationship with Eastwood, a fact which undoubtedly counted against her in their painful legal contest.

She became a test case and talking-point in America’s ѕехսаւ politics debate when she sued Eastwood twice, once for “palimony” after their relationship acrimoniously ended, and then a second time for fraud, alleging that the project-development deal Eastwood subsequently set up for her was a trick, designed to buy off the palimony suit and which resulted in no directing jobs.

She claimed she had been thrown out of her house by the man she thought was the love of her life. It could well be that Locke was the victim of macho mind games, and her case was an eerie echo of the critic Pauline Kael who was suckered into (temporarily) quitting her job at the New Yorker by Warren Beatty for a similarly unproductive production deal.

Sondra Locke in Impulse (1990). Photograph: Warner Bros

And Locke was a serious-minded if underused director. Her 1986 fantasy-parable Ratboy (produced by Eastwood) was the subject of much critical bafflement, mockery and head-scratching, but it gained a certain cult status: the LA Times called it a fairytale with a cutting edge. It was a bizarre Elephant-Man-type story of a desperate woman (played by Locke herself) who discovers a hybrid creature in a dumpster, part rat, part human, and tries to exploit him/it commercially.

It could be that Locke was commenting on the nature of exploitation and that she herself knew what it was like to be hybrid: part ѕехy female lead, and part serious director whose talents couldn’t be acknowledged in a misogynist business. As for Eastwood, there was no doubting what  Locke thought. There was no “hybrid”. He was all rat.

Earlier, in Josey Wales, she was the young granddaughter of a woman, rescued from Comanches by the revenger Wales. The Gauntlet was a better showcase role for her: she is the prostitute with mob connections whom Eastwood’s hardbitten alcoholic cop has to accompany from Las Vegas to Phoenix to testify in court against the gangsters. She taunts her minder continually: “You really get off roughing up girls, huh?”

Clint Eastwood and Sondra Locke in Any Which Way You Can (1980)

In the knockabout adventure comedy Every Which Way But Loose, co-starring an orangutan, she plays Lynn, the alluring but duplicitous country singer with whom Eastwood’s character falls in love. She sings her own stuff, including the song Too Loose (“Your love’s too loose and mine is too tight….”).

It isn’t often thought of an integral part of the Eastwood canon but this was one of his biggest hits and a vital part of his clout in the industry — that clout, in fact, which Locke thought he was going to use to sponsor her directing career. As for Eastwood, he appeared mildly bemused at the way the orangutan stole the show, but it was all playing sweet music at the box office.

In Bronco Billy, Locke had what was probably her best role opposite Eastwood: she is the disaffected heiress, Lily, who smokes cigarettes through a holder and loathes her scheming stepmother and who instantly gets a ѕехսаւ frisson from her encounter with Billy (Eastwood) a former shoe salesman turned pseudo-cowboy who leads a travelling Wild West circus show. She gamely joins up as his assistant.

None of the Eastwood films really stretched her, and sadly when it came for her to play the famous singer Rosemary Clooney (aunt of George) in a TV movie in 1982, the songs were dubbed by ¨Clooney herself. Perhaps the veteran director Alan Rudolph gave her more of a chance in her final film, Ray Meets Helen, from 2017, a moody and elegiac film in which she is an ageing loner who forms a relationship with Keith Carradine’s ex-boxer.

Would it have been better for Locke if she had never had a personal relationship with one of Hollywood’s biggest male stars? Maybe. But her portfolio of potential couldn’t easily be fitted into any of the career paths mostly occupied by men. – Guardian

Clint Eastwood

Shyam Benegal: ‘You Don’t Have To Give The Audience What They Want; You Have To Create Something New…”

Circa 50 years ago, Shyam Benegal was in the vanguard of the offbeat cinema movement with path-breaking 1970s films such as Ankur (Shabana Azmi, Anant Nag), Nishant (Girish Karnad, Shabana Azmi, Naseeruddin Shah), Manthan (Smita Patil, Girish Karnad) and Bhumika (Smita Patil, Amol Palekar). Benegal’s filmmaking, though, started even earlier. He reminds us, “My career didn’t start with feature films. I have made several documentaries before and since that were very satisfying too.” And of course he went on to helm the seminal TV show Bharat Ek Khoj.In his late 80s now, Benegal is still in the thick of things. Mention his latest film, Mujib: The Making Of A Nation, and he quips, “That has been completed and released.” He is immersed in the present, where the current mood of cinema, especially OTT, is in alignment with the temperament of this forward-thinking filmmaker.
Excerpts from the interview
It is amazing that filmmakers like Clint Eastwood, Martin Scorcese and you continue to make films even after crossing 80. Would you say the creative impulse is as strong even now as it was 50 years ago when you made Ankur?
I am 89 years old now, and Clint Eastwood is 93. The fact that Clint Eastwood continues to make films at his age inspires me too. The creative urge is still strong within me. I’m a filmmaker and I am still driven by the desire to make films. And that is why I still make cinema. I haven’t been well over the last few years … it comes with old age (said dryly). I have to undergo dialysis almost every second day. But, despite all that, I can’t retire.
Zubeidaa

Zubeidaa |

Your latest film Mujib: The Making Of A Nation has just been released. What gripped you about the subject?
He is the man who paved the way for the creation of Bangladesh. I found his story intriguing and I think it made for interesting cinema.
Ankur Ankur |

What challenges did you face while making the film, especially bilingual?
Every film I have made has presented its own set of challenges. This film was made in Bengali but the Bengali spoken in the eastern parts is different from the language spoken in West Bengal. In fact, within Bangladesh itself, the Bangla in Dhaka is different from the dialect in Chittagong. Thanks to the literature I had read and the music I have heard,  I was aware of the culture this side of the border, but I had to familiarise myself with the milieu of the east for the film.
You have made several biographies earlier like Bhumika, Sardar Begum, Zubeidaa and films on Gandhi, Bose and now Sheikh Mujibur Rehman. As a filmmaker, is it possible to be objective about your subject?
I make these films because I admire these people, but as a filmmaker I have to be objective. However, one’s objectivity is limited by one’s perception of these people. Every filmmaker has his own viewpoint, his perception. They are fascinating characters… How you present them cinematically depends on your sensibility and sensitivity.
It is now 50 years since you made your first feature film Ankur (1973). Has it been a satisfying journey creatively?
No and yes. Every person strives for perfection but that is not always possible so one has to keep striving, and find satisfaction in the creative process. I have enjoyed experimenting with varied themes … from serious films to Mandi which was a comedy on the subject of prostitution.
MujubMujub |

You have made 24 feature films in these five decades, what are your three best films?
That is not possible for me because when I look back I notice flaws in my films. It’s also a matter of opinion. Many people, including me, would say that Pather Panchali is Satyajit Ray’s best film but he himself thought that Charulata was his most refined work.
You followed Ankur with critical triumphs like Nishant, Manthan, Bhumika and Junoon. This string of 1970s films can be credited with starting the art film movement in Hindi cinema. Your thoughts.
I have been a part of the art film movement but there were so many other directors who were making these kinds of films — Ritwik Ghatak, Adoor Gopalakrishnan, Mrinal Sen, Satyajit Ray, M S Sathyu, Govind Nihalani and others.
You have been a part of Indian cinema for 50 years, would you say it has changed for the better?
Technologically, the equipment available nowadays for lighting, editing and shooting is tremendous and they are able to shoot much faster. In comparison, the techniques we had were very primitive. Thematically too, cinema is bound to change because it have to keep up with the times. You don’t have to give the audience what they what, you have to create something new that they did not know they wanted.

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Clint Eastwood

10 forgotten Clint Eastwood films that few remember

To speak of Clint Eastwood is to allude to one of the most important actors and directors in Hollywood who, incidentally, took time to be mayor of the town of Carmel-by-the-Sea.
With more than 70 credits in his career, just as an actor, we tend to be clear about which Clint Eastwood masterpieces to evoke when we talk about his career.
Movies like The Good, the Bad and the Ugly, No forgiveness, Dirty Harry o Million Dollar Baby They are essential stops in his filmography, not to mention legendary ones like The iron sergeant o Gran Torino.
But today, in HobbyCine de Hobby Consolas, we will talk about 10 Clint Eastwood films that are usually forgotten by a large part of the public.
On the tightrope
On the Tightrope (1984)


Let’s start with one of the best eighties thrillers that Clint Eastwood starred in in the eighties: On the tightrope.
He actor Californian has starred in many thrillers throughout his career and, for some reason, this film with psychological overtones is not usually one of the first to come to fans’ minds.
Eastwood plays Wes Block, a New Orleans detective investigating a serial rapist and killer wreaking havoc on the city.
Soon, he discovers that he and the murderer have several sinister points in common, bringing to the surface fears that he thought buried forever.
The blacklist
The Blacklist (1988)
In 1988, Clint Eastwood played for the last time Harry Callahanthe always controversial Dirty Harry, in The blacklist.
For some, the weakest of the saga, for others, as good as the first. Be that as it may, the movie directed by Buddy Van Horn It is not the first that comes to mind when talking about the most scoundrel police officer that the actor has ever starred in.
Of course, some of us still look askance at remote-controlled cars when we see them on the street, lest it be…
A haul of $500,000
A $500,000 Loot (1974)
Eastwood’s career also took its time in heist films and buddy movies, and one of his seventies films was A haul of $500,000.
The movie of Michael Cimino paired Clint Eastwood with Jeff Bridges to plan and carry out a robbery of the supposedly impregnable Bank of Montana.
“Lightning”‘s (Eastwood) former partners form an uneasy alliance with them that could be more problematic than beneficial.
A $500,000 Loot is a great film that, despite all the technological advances, has aged quite well, being released in 1974.
The seducer
The Seducer (1971)
We cannot forget the heartthrob Clint Eastwood: to think that the actor only plays tough guys who would crack you like a nut for looking at them wrong would be unfair.
The seducer It takes us to the American Civil War, where the actor plays a northern soldier wounded in combat who is rescued by a young woman from a girls’ school.
After taking him to school, when the soldier recovers, he becomes a conqueror who drives everyone crazy, and by crazy we mean that the school becomes the headquarters of Celos International.
Alcatraz escape
Escape from Alcatraz (1979)
Don Siegel and Clint Eastwood have collaborated on numerous occasions throughout their respective careers. In 1979, director and actor signed Alcatraz escape.
See if we tend to forget this film, consolega, that even a certain editor of this website – yours truly – forgot about it when writing a news story about The Rock and stating that Sean Connery He was the first to escape from prison.
The best prison series: Vis a vis, Wentworth, Prison Break...
Clint Eastwood plays a tremendously insightful and intelligent inmate who has had enough of the prison system after several successful escapes.
In the end they intern him in the maximum security prison of Alcatraz, in San Francisco Bay, daring him to escape from where no one has managed to escape. A challenge that he gladly accepted.
Two mules and a woman
Two Mules and a Woman (1970)
In fact, Don Siegel was also in the director’s chair of Two mules and a womanone of Clint Eastwood’s westerns that we most often overlook.
Nor is it a bad film if there is a logical reason for it to be an unnoticed Western, but other films by the actor, such as The Good, the Bad and the Ugly, The Legend of the Nameless City, Death Had a Price or A Fistful of Dollarsthey tend to overshadow it.
License to kill
License to Kill (1975)
In addition to sharing a title with one of the James Bond films, although the 007 film came almost three decades later, License to kill was one of Clint Eastwood’s first films as an actor and director.
Released in 1975, this thriller uses the trope of the protagonist who reaches a dark past that he thought he had left behind.
Eastwood plays a former hitman who worked for an international organization.
Although he is retired, he is blackmailed and ordered to kill one of the three people trying to summit the Eiger in the Swiss Alps.
A perfect world
A Perfect World (1993)
A perfect world is a film that had the bad luck to see the light of day a year after Unforgiven and, in many ways, is overshadowed even by In the line of firealso released in 1993.
This road movie with a sixties setting puts Clint Eastwood in the shoes of a Texas ranger in charge of hunting down fugitives who have kidnapped a child during their escape.
suicide route
Suicide Route (1977)
Among Clint Eastwood’s police thrillers in the seventies, we also find the frequently forgotten Suicide Route.
The actor plays an alcoholic police officer who has the mission of escorting a prostitute from Las Vegas to Phoenix, although the obstacles they will encounter to prevent the witness from giving a statement will be constant.
Space Cowboys
Space Cowboys (2000)
More than forgotten, Space Cowboys It is usually vilified without much reason, since it is a very entertaining product without being, by any means, the best thing that Clint Eastwood has done.
The actor and director surrounds himself with some of the biggest names in Hollywood who have been sporting gray hair for decades for one last rodeo, yes, in orbit.
When a Russian satellite leaves its orbit, the creator of its systems is tasked with repairing it, but he will only go into orbit in the company of the companions he was able to fly with in the past.
None of the Clint Eastwood films that we have mentioned today are bad, far from it, but they are works that tend to be buried in that ocean of masterpieces that the actor and director has left behind throughout his many decades in the industry.

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Clint Eastwood

Clint Eastwood wanted to do a stunt aged 90, and no one could stop him

We’d never want to disagree with Clint Eastwood. If he said jump, we’d ask how high, and if he demanded we let him ride a horse in his 10th decade on Earth, then we’d be powerless to resist the great man’s equine ambitions.
That’s exactly what happened during the production of Clint Eastwood‘s most recent movie as director, Cry Macho. The remarkable commitment and efficiency that keeps new movies coming from Eastwood also meant that he wanted to ride a horse himself in the film, despite the fact he’d recently celebrated his 90th birthday and hadn’t ridden since making Unforgiven – still one of the best Westerns ever made – in the early 1990s.
“The wrangler was worried,” Eastwood explained to the LA Times. “She was saying: ‘Be careful, be careful now’. She was scared I’d end up on my rear end. But if you treat the horse like a buddy, he’ll take care of you.”
The horse wasn’t even the only stunt Eastwood volunteered to do himself. He was swinging his fists about too, throwing a punch in one particular confrontation. “It might not be as good as I’ve thrown in the past but it was fun to do it,” said Eastwood.
You can see Eastwood getting back in the saddle in this behind-the-scenes video from the set of the movie.
YouTube Thumbnail

Cry Macho filmed in late-2020, just after Hollywood had begun production in the wake of the pandemic shutdown. Eastwood had been trying to adapt N. Richard Nash’s 1975 novel for decades and finally decided to take on the lead role as a former rodeo rider tasked with bringing a young boy back to his father.
The stars aligned for Eastwood this time, decades after he was first approached with the story in the 1980s. At the time, he offered to direct, but declared they should get an older actor for the lead role. Later versions of the project could have starred Arnold Schwarzenegger – a very different take, but one we’d love to see – before it eventually came full circle back to Eastwood.
In that LA Times interview, Eastwood explained that he still loves being one of Hollywood’s best directors, but is considering hanging up his acting boots. “I’ve gotten to the point where I wondered if that was enough, but not to the point where I decided it was. If you roll out a few turkeys, they’ll tell you soon enough,” he said.
Clint Eastwood was 90 when he starred in Cry Macho
We think Eastwood still has a lot to offer on both sides of the camera, even at this stage of his illustrious career. He’s not up to the high watermark of the best movies in his career these days, but he’s delivering some very solid work in films like Cry Macho and The Mule. If he doesn’t want to slow down, he shouldn’t.
Eastwood has suggested that his upcoming movie Juror No. 2 might be his last but, if we know Clint, he won’t be able to resist working for as long as his health allows.
For more of the great man’s cinematic legacy, find out our picks for the best Clint Eastwood movies and learn why Clint Eastwood rejected a “grim” Dirty Harry role. Finally, delve back into the archives to find out why Clint Eastwood almost quit acting after one of his worst movies.

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