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John Wayne

The feud between John Wayne and Clint Eastwood

For western genre enthusiasts, Clint Eastwood is an almost untouchable icon. Loved and revered by anyone who has held a toothpick in their mouth without any intent to pick their teeth, there is perhaps only a handful of Hollywood heroes who can stand nose to nose with the legend. It just so happens, that Eastwood incurred the displeasure of such a legendary cowboy—none other than John Wayne.
Eastwood starred in the 1973 film High Plains Drifter which he also directed. Now a classic, the film was absolutely hated by John Wayne, an iconic figure in the western genre and Eastwood’s senior. It was a clear moment of Wayne punching down the ladder and trying to disrupt a young artist making their way in Tinseltown.
Just Eastwood’s second directorial effort, High Plains Drifter was released at the very height of the actor’s popularity, merely two years after the crime thriller Dirty Harry had cemented his position in pop culture. A critical darling, High Plains Drifter tells the story of a mysterious stranger who is persuaded by a town to defend them against a vicious trio of crooks, showing just how much the figure of Eastwood is respected out in the wild west.
Eastwood revealed in his book, Ride, Boldly Ride: The Evolution of the American Western, however that the film displeased one particularly loud cowboy. Wayne sent a vicious letter to the star, as Eastwood revealed, “He [Wayne] said it wasn’t really about the people who pioneered the west. I realised that there’s two different generations, and he wouldn’t understand what I was doing.”
To clarify the intentions behind making the film, the veteran actor said, “High Plains Drifter was meant to be a fable. It wasn’t meant to show the hours of pioneering drudgery. It wasn’t supposed to be anything about settling the west.”
The film revolves around Eastwood as a gun-slinging drifter who rides into Lago and is met with great resistance. However, the people recognise his talent with the pistol and enlist his help to fight against a band of hooligans who have been plaguing the twon. The drifter agrees but with a hidden agenda of his own.
In comparison, Wayne’s films were vastly different from the film in question. High Plains Drifter is darker and more violent than Wayne’s usual films, which essentially ride on nursery rhyme tropes of good vs. evil. Wayne’s characters relied on the very essence of their goodness to displace their enemies, often never needing guns to scare people due to his intimidating presence. Eastwood’s characters are mysterious and do not speak much; their more violent and drenched in the intoxicating cinematic appeal of adventure.
It’s easy to see how, as time passed, the two men would see each other in different creative realms. As Eastwood began to find his directorial niche and step behind the camera for some of his greatest movies, Wayne would lean on his cowboy image and add a comparatively bloated end of his career to the resume. This disagreement alone sees the artistic differences between them.

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High Plains Drifter Official Trailer #1 - Clint Eastwood Movie (1973) HD

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John Wayne

John Wayne’s Mom Said She ‘Didn’t Give a Damn About Him’ After He Paid for an All-Around-the-World Vacation for Her

Mother’s Day is an opportunity to celebrate and honor the mother of a family, as well as motherhood and maternal bonds at large. However, not everyone has the closest relationship with their family. John Wayne and his mom certainly had a volatile relationship over the years. However, it’s especially shocking to see how she responded after returning from an all-expenses-paid trip around the world that her son paid for.

John Wayne’s mom was ‘stern’ throughout the actor’s life

John Wayne as Col. Cord McNally in 'Rio Lobo' in a cowboy outfit looking down at the ground, who's real mom was Mary 'Molly' Alberta Brown

John Wayne as Col. Cord McNally in 'Rio Lobo' in a cowboy outfit looking down at the ground, who's real mom was Mary 'Molly' Alberta Brown

Scott Eyman’s John Wayne: The Life and Legend takes a look through the life of the iconic actor, including his family life. He was born to Mary “Molly” Alberta Brown and Clyde Leonard Morrison, who moved to Palmdale and then to Glendale in California. Wayne’s mom never had the close and positive relationship that he had with his dad. According to Eyman, “Molly didn’t have the temperament to jolly him along.”

Molly always showed favoritism toward the actor’s younger brother, Robert. She even took away his middle name and gave it to the younger brother when he was born. As a result, Wayne always preferred spending time with his father. One of their neighbors named Alice Miller described Wayne’s mom as, “a stern woman. You had to be real careful around her. She could fly off the handle when you least expected it.”

John Wayne: The Life and the Legend continued to show how Wayne’s mom wasn’t very kind toward the actor over the years. He tried to develop a closer relationship with her and provide her with nice accommodations on an expansive trip. However, these favors didn’t ultimately get the mother and son any closer.

“His relationship with his mother remained unrewarding,” Eyman wrote. “Every year he sent his mother and her second husband on a vacation. One year, it was an around-the-world, all-expenses-paid trip. When they got back, Wayne greeted them and wanted to hear all about it.”

Eyman continued: “Sidney Preen, Wayne’s stepfather, raved about the trip and thanked him profusely. Molly just complained—the flights were tiring, the service was bad, etc. Wayne’s response was a visible deflation. After he left the room, Mary St. John [Wayne’s confidante] asked Molly, ‘Don’t you think you could be a little nicer to him sometimes?’”

However, Wayne’s mom replied: “I don’t give a damn about him.”

The actor’s official social media page still reflects on Mother’s Day

However, Wayne’s mom replied: “I don’t give a damn about him.”

The actor’s official social media page still reflects on Mother’s Day

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The actor’s official Twitter account continues to share Happy Mother’s Day posts in honor of Wayne’s mom. They didn’t have the closest relationship, but it’s certainly clear that the Duke made an effort. He always held onto his relationship with his children, not repeating the same mistake. Wayne was often sentimental when it came to close friends and family.

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John Wayne

John Wayne Was Stunned When Ron Howard Asked Him To Rehearse Lines for ‘The Shootist’

Ron Howard was only in his early 20s when he encountered John Wayne and learned how to work with one of the most intimidating men in Hollywood.

Decades later, Howard still raves about Wayne’s work ethic. The two worked together on The Shootist , a key career moment for both. The Shootist represented an actual adult-ish role for Howard. Fans of classic TV knew Howard as Opie in The Andy Griffith Show or Richie Cunningham in Happy Days . Meanwhile, Duke’s movie career was coming to an end. He was 69 when he took on the role of J.B. Books, the gunslinger dying of cancer. It was Wayne’s final film role.

So how did John Wayne treat Ron Howard as they made this movie? Well, Howard had no qualms asking the iconic actor to run lines with him. These were Howard’s observations during an interview with the Huffington Post in 2014.

“I always admired him as a movie star, but I thought of him as a total naturalist,” Ron Howard said of John Wayne. “Even those pauses were probably him forgetting his line and then remembering it again, because, man, he’s The Duke.

“But he’s working on this scene and he’s like, ‘Let me try this again.’ And he put the little hitch in and he’d find the Wayne rhythm, and you’d realize that it changed the performance each and every time. I’ve worked with Bette Davis, John Wayne, Jimmy Stewart, Henry Fonda. Here’s the thing they all have in common: They all, even in their 70s, worked a little harder than everyone else.”

The movie also starred Lauren Bacall, as the owner of the boarding house, and Jimmy Stewart as Books’ doctor. As the movie opened, a doctor told Books that he was dying of cancer. The doctor even said it might be less painful for Book to die in a gunfight. So Books decided to plan his own death. He invited three other gunfighters to meet him at a bar. There, they could kill him.

Howard portrayed Gillom Rogers, Bacall’s son. Gillom came into the bar after the three gunslingers gathered to kill Books. But Wayne’s character was true to himself until the end. He ended up killing his invited guests. However, the bartender popped Books. And as Books died, he watched as Howard shot the bartender, then threw away the gun. The move definitely was Books approved.

In an interview with The Oklahoman, Howard gave even more details about working with Wayne on the set. For one, Wayne wasn’t vain. He did wear a hairpiece. But he didn’t care if people saw him without his hair. That was the case when Howard got his first introduction.

“I’ll never forget the fact that he never, ever made me feel like a kid,” Howard told the Oklahoman. “He treated me like a pro . . . one pro working with another.”

The post John Wayne Was Stunned When Ron Howard Asked Him To Rehearse Lines for ‘The Shootist’ appeared first on Outsider .

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John Wayne

Melinda Wayne Munoz cause of death

Munoz, Melinda Wayne John Wayne Cancer Foundation Advocate and Supporter Passes Away Melinda Wayne Munoz has died, and the cause of death is unknown.

Melinda Wayne Munoz, John Wayne’s daughter, and a John Wayne Cancer Foundation Advocator and Supporter, passed away unexpectedly. In an online statement, JOHN WAYNE confirmed her death. The circumstances surrounding her death had not been made public at the time of publication.

15 foto's en beelden met Melinda Wayne Munoz - Getty Images

JOHN WAYNE said, “We are heartbroken to learn that John Wayne’s daughter, Melinda Wayne Munoz, died this week.”Melinda was the fourth of John Wayne’s seven children and the youngest child of his first marriage to Josephine Saenz.

Melinda Wayne Munoz, John Wayne’s daughter, and a John Wayne Cancer Foundation Advocator and Supporter, passed away unexpectedly. In an online statement, JOHN WAYNE confirmed her death. The circumstances surrounding her death had not been made public at the time of publication.

15 Melinda Wayne Munoz Photos and Premium High Res Pictures - Getty Images

“Melinda was the grandmother of fourteen and the mother of five children.” She has been a passionate advocate and supporter in the fight against cancer for the past 35 years through the John Wayne Cancer Foundation.

“If you’ve ever met Melinda, you know how warm, welcoming, and passionate she is, and she almost certainly made you laugh!” At this time, our thoughts are with her family.”

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